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THE STICK 



EASTER 
GREETINGS 


m 



Vol. Ill, No. 24 



State Teachers College, Fitchburg 



Thursday, April 14, 1938 



|Elementary Curriculum Changed 
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MISS ELDRIDGE 
RETURNS TO DUTIES 

Soon the reverberating beat of 
the feet of our energetic music in- 
structor will sound again through 
the halls of F.T.C. Miss Eldridge 
is scheduled to be back carrying 
on where she left off, beginning 
the week before vacation. 

She has started this week, how- 
ever, to polish up on graduation 
music with the orchestra whom 
she is scheduled to meet on 
Wednesday from 3 to 4. 

Miss Eldridge has been greatly 
missed by the musical organiza- 
tions because her absence has de- 
layed many of their plans. 

We're glad to have you with 
us again, Miss Eldridge. 



Liberal Arts Course To Be Offered For 
First Two Years To Elementary Students 

The Massachusette Department of Education has announced the 
changes to be made in the curriculum for the training of elementary 
school teachers. This curriculum has been drawn up by a committee 
of Teachers College Presidents and will go into affect with next 
September's entering class. 

It is expected that the emphasis on Liberal Arts subjects in the 
first two years may attract a number of students who wish such train- 
ing without any thought of professional preparation for training. 

There will be a like change made in the Junior High School cur- 
riculum and this change will be announced in a few weeks. 

No major changes will be made in the Practical Arts program. 
Note. This program is not an innovation for several states have 
been carrying on like programs for five years or more. 
First Year Second Year 



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THE WEEK'S SCHEDULE 

Schedule for the week of 
April 18 to 23 inclusive: 
Monday 

-Baseball Practice 
-Intra-mural Volleyball 

Tuesday 
Holiday 

Wednesday 

-Glee Club 
-Girls' Badminton 
-Baseball Practice 
Thursday 

-Assembly 

-M.A. Board Meeting 
-Girls' Volleyball 
-Baseball Practice 

Friday 
Baseball Practice 
Saturday 

seball F.T.C. vs. 

Hyannis — Here 



3:30- 
4:00- 



12:30- 
3:00- 
3:30- 



11:00- 

^2:40- 

4:00- 

3:30- 



3:30— 



3:00— 



General Psychology 

Physical Science 

Freshman English 

World History 

Mathematics 

Speech 

Physical Education 

: Electives 



Biological Science 4 

Sophomore Literature 6 

United States History 3 
Government & Citizenship 3 

Logic 3 

Fine Arts 6 

Speech 1 

Physical Education 1 

*Electives 6 



-Continued 



33 

On Page Four 



REV. MR. MAX KAPP 
REVIEWS BOOK 

Tuesday of this week, April 12, 
at the auditorium, the Junior 
class sponsored a very interest- 
ing assembly when they present- 
ed the Rev. Max Kapp, pastor at 
the First Universalist Church of 
this city in his interpretation of 
the book, "Marie Curie". 

This biography of the late 
woman scientist was written by 
Eve Curie, daughter of Marie; 
and translated into English by 
Vincent Sheehan. Mr. Kapp, in 
his usual dynamic manner, in- 
jected feeling and modern-day 
lessons into his survey, showing 

—Continued On Page Three 



PHYLLIS BURGER 
WINS SPELLING BEE 

Phyllis Burger, 13, of 9 Butt- 
rick Avenue, Fitchburg, a stud- 
ent in the eighth grade of the 
F. T. C. Junior High School , was 
the victor in a spelling bee which 
was held in the assembly hall 
Tuesday, April 5th. This spelling 
bee was held under the auspices 
of the "Worcester Telegram and 
Gazette", to determine the best 
speller in the "district" including 
Goodrich Street School, St. 
Joseph's School and the T. C. J. 
H. S. 

This makes the third spelling 
bee that Phyllis Burger has won. 

— Continued On Pa?e Two 



Page Two 



THE STICK 



Thursday, April 14, 1938 



THE 




£=3 STICK 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Andrew Owens 

Associate Editor Herbert Downs 

Business Manager Harry O'Connell 

News Editor Lester Aldrich 

Feature Editor Bradley Leonard 

Sports Editors Mary Disken 
Alfred Turner 

Shop Foreman Harry O'Connell 



FHE^HTRAY 



Bernie Roth 



Thursday, April 14, 1938 



EDITORIAL 



MEN'S REST ROOM 

The Men's Student Association 
has as one of its duties the care 
and upkeep of the Men's Rest 
Room. For the care of this room, 
the president of the association 
appoints a committee which 
sometimes is efficient and some- 
times is just another committee, 
but for the upkeep of this room 
there is no allotment made in the 
budget. 

The Rest Room is used as a 
smoking room, recreation room, 
dining hall and dressing room. 
The furniture of this multiple 
purpose room has a great deal 
of hard usage and its life expect- 
ancy is short. When anything is 
broken or worn out there is no 
money to repair or replace it. 

The Men's Student Association, 
or any system of student govern- 
ment that might replace it, should 
have in its budget an item to 
adequately cover the upkeep of 
our Men's Rest Room. 



Andy Owens 



Now it comes out: Punster Hill, 
after hearing the Lowell Choir, 
admitted that the trumpeter was 
"choir" good-looking girl. Like- 

| wise Bob Mc Dowell, after T. 

jPettee (the wit) had left the ta- 
ble, was heard to remark that it 
certainly felt swell to have a 
"thorn" removed from his side. 
Would you Beul-ieve it? . . E. 
Comeau has to sleep longer be- 
cause he sleeps slower than the 
rest of us. Brae had the Gavs 
howling the other night, with his 
delightfully idiomatic use of the 
expression "getting a hold of 
people and stuff and things." We 
find ourselves heartily in accord 
with Master Student John Flood 
who observed regarding the pop- 
ularity of Ferdinand: "The little 
bull has certainly go le a long 
ways." Didn't we always tell you? 
Now that track is no more, 
Savoy has taken to commuting, 

I Ross Street is neglected, and the 
boys have taken to walking. The 

j last-mentioned may have some- 
thing to do with spring, which, as 
has been elsewhere noted, has 
arrived. We, as far as is known, 
are the first to observe that the 
voice of the turtle is heard again 
in the land. Or had you already 
noticed? There is a place where 
Washington Irving says that 
spring is the time to "look pale, 
50 neatly, write poetry, and be 
most apparently in love." Miss 
Nixon's literature classes have 
taken this so seriously — particu- 
larly the poetry part — that we 
feel that this benighted campus 
is due to see a renaissance of 
verse, heroic and otherwise, al- 
most any day now. Why, only 

j yesterday, Joe Anderson was at 
the Hasting Conservatory, just to 
see how a crocus shoot, shoots. 
It's in the air! 

Still speaking of verse, there's 
a yogi living somewhere in Palm- 
er Hall who thrives on a diet of 



SPELLING BEE 

— Continued From Page One 

1 She won the home room match. 

1 ' 

j the school match, and the dis- 
trict match. She will represent 
her district in the Grand Final 
Spelling Bee to determine the 
championship of all Central 
Massachusetts. The Final Pee 
will be held Friday evening, May 
13, at the Worcester Memorial 
Auditorium. 

The winner of the Final Bee 
will be declared Champion of 
Central Massachusetts, and will 
be sent to Washington, with ail 
expenses paid, to represent Cen- 
tral Massachusetts at the Nation- 
al Spelling Bee May 31. 

The winner of the National 
Spelling Bee w T ill receive a cash 
I av/ard of $500, the person stand- 
|ing second will receive $300, and 
; all contestants will receive a $50 
; bonus. 

I water tumblers which have an 
annoying habit of being extreme- 
ly absent just when the boys most 
need them. Anyway, the situation 
evoked some rhyming from J. 
Bresnahan, who the other eve- 
ning walked into the proctor's 
room with: "Hey, Mister Busby, 
I got complaint I need a glass, and 
by gosh, there ain't." We'll let you 
get away with that, Bresny, only 
on poetic license. 

Since this seems to be the all- 
poetry number, let's wind up the 
sitting while we read you a legend 
that has lately come out of the 
training schools. The heroine 
must have been one of those pro- 
gressive educators, we hope so, 
and good enough for her: 

There once was a trainer infal- 
lible. 

Who seldom waxed at all 
voluble — 

Till she became all aware 

Of a tack in her chair; 

Then her language turned pretty 
intol'a'ble. 
Sic transit gloria until next 

week! 



Thursday, April 14, 1938 



THE STICK 



Page Three 



Tennis Team 
Has 9 Games 

MEN'S SPORTS 



SPORT PAGE 



Black II, Wins 
Two Games 




"BATTER UP" 

The Assembly Committee will 
present April 21, "Batter Up," an 
educational film with an appeal 
to all types of audiences, nar- 
rated by Ted Husing and pro- 
duced by General Motors. 

This film features practically 
every department of play used 
in baseball and illustrates the 
fine points of this game which is 
such a popular national pastime. 
It includes views of the league's 
baseball school, All Star game 
and the World Series stars of the 
American league. 

TENNIS SCHEDULE 

Manager Joe Daniels has ar- 
ranged one of the hardest sched- 
ules for tennis this season that 
any team has ever had here at 
Fitchburg. 

The schedule is as follows: 

May 6 — American Internation- 
al — at Springfield 

May 9 — Bridgewater — at 
Bridgewater 

May 14 — New Britain — at New 
Britain 

May 13 — New Britain — Home 

May 20 — Boston College — 
Home 

May 21 — New England Teachers 
Tournament — at Salem 

May 23 — Bridgewater — Home 



May 26 — Worcester Tech — 

Home 
June 1 — Assumption College — 

Home 
Matches are pending with Keene 
Normal and Rhode Island School 
of Education. 

The two teams added this year 
are Worcester Tech, and Boston 
College, two top notchers in the 
New England College circuits. 

VOLLEYBALL 

The M. A. A. Board at a recent 
meeting, put into effect a new 
rule concerning intra-mural vol- 
leyball in order to create more 
interest in this sport. This rule 
states that teams which do not 
put in an appearance at the time 
scheduled for the game, auto- 
matically lose by a forfeit. If 
both teams fail to appear, the 
board has decided to drop them 
from the league. All remaining 
teams please take notice of this 
new rule. 

Two big games were scheduled 
for last Monday; one between 
the Junior G. M. and the Fresh- 
man P. A., the other between the 
Sophomore P. A. and the Senior 
P. A. Both the Junior G. M. and 
the Freshman 'P. A. forfeited 
their chances to stay in the 
league neither one had a team 
present. The Sophomore P. A. 
won by forfeit over the Senior P. 
A. This means that the Sopho- 
more go into the finals. 



WOMEN'S SPORTS 

FLAY DAY 

Leominster, Gardner, Groton, 
Lunenburg, Townsend, and Fitch- 
burg High Schools will be invited 
to Fitchburg Teachers College on 
April 27 to participate in a Play 
Day similar to the sports pro- 
gram which was conducted by 
the Women's Athletic Associa- 



WOMEN'S SPORTS 




tion about three years ago. Flor- 
ence Lovell has been chosen to 
act as general chairman for the 
Play Day, and is at present 
working on plans which will be 
announced later in detail. 

GIRLS' VOLLEYBALL 

The gymnasium was the scene 
of several colorful and exciting 
volleyball games in which Black, 
Orange, and White teams were 
engaged on Tuesday afternoon. 
The Head of Volleyball, Arlene 
Molaghan, together with Miss 
Bolger, chose first and second 
teams from each color group, 
and planned the afternoon's 
schedule in order that each team 
could play twice. 

The teams were very evenly 
matched, the second Black team 
being the only outfit to win more 
than one game. The battle be- 
tween the Orange first team and 
the White first team contained 
the longest rallies and the most 
excitement. 

Final scores were as follows: 
Orange I (Capt. O'Conner) 32, 
Black I ( Capt. McAuliff ) 18 ; 
Orange II (Capt. Ward) 19, 
White II (Capt. Hackett) 12; 
Black I 24, White I (Capt. Whit- 
comb) 15; Black II (Capt. Con- 
nelly) 20, Orange II 11; White I 
23, Orange I 15; Black II 14, 
White II 10. 



Page Four 



THE STICK Thursday, April 14, 1938 

CURRICULUM CHANGED -Continued From Pa*e On7 

*Electives 

Choose from the following: 
Geography 
English History 
Foreign Language 
Literature 
Art 
Music 
The following courses in Education are to be included in the third 
and fourth year programs in the Elementary Course: — 

Methods in English 6 

Primary Reading and Language 

Children's Literature 

Spelling 

Penmanship , 

Arithmetic 2 

Music and Art 2 

Geography and History 2 

Science ~ 2 

Educational Psychology and Tests and Measurements 4 

History of Education 2 

Practice Teaching and Observation 8 

In additiion to the above the following courses are prescribed: — 

Third Year Fourth Year 

Physical Education 1 Speech 1 

Speech 1 Philosophy of Ed. 2 

Geography 6 Hygiene 2 

Sociology 4 Physical Education 1 

Economics 4 Electives 12 





By the way, do you have a pet 
phrase that you repeat often? 

Here are a few: 

"Kids-did I tell you this one?" 
— Anna Clifford 

"How goes the battle?"— Paul 
Devecis 

"Get your news in on time!" — 
— Andy Owens 

"I'm happy about the whole 
thing!"— Ed O'Sheasy 

"Howdy!" — Mr. Weston 

"Got anything to eat?"— Ruth 
Hughes 

"Say, who are you? anyway?" 
Gerry Lyons 

"Wanna hear something fun- 



ny" 



-E. Scully 



"Have you read the book?" — 
Miss Nixon 

More fun — more people 
killed!"— Stan English 

(Chuckle) "Isn't that awful?" 
— Norma Richardson 

"A little chatter out there!" — 
Coach Jeffries 

Advice to baseballers: The bet- 
ter the batter, the bigger the 
bagger! (I must have found that 
one in a sandlot) 

According to newspaper re- 
ports, Hitler is going places by 
leaps and boundaries! 



When Better Foods Are Wanted 
Visit 

The College Spa 



M( 



Candy 



16 



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JUNIOR ASSEMBLY 

— Continued From Page One 

sufferings and deprivations of 
Mme. Curie in her student days 
at the Sorbonne, and the years 
1898 to 1902, in which she and 
her husband pursued their re- 
searches in what one might call 
a shack. The Reverend Mr. Kapp 
revealed to us, not a cold-blooded 
scientist, but a woman of emo- 
'ional depth and spiritual integ- 
rity, — not a member of any 
church, but a soul as spiritual 
nd good as any saint in history. 



City Steam Laundry, Inc. 

170 North Street 

lei. 1166 Fitchburg, Mm*s. 



Mrs. Pierce, our music teacher 
who has been working in that 
capacity during Miss Eldridge's, 
absence, showed her ability as a 
pianist, and revealed to us some- 
thing that we had not expected. 
Playing with great skill and feel- 
mg, she presented a waltz by 
Strauss, "June Rose," and "The 
Trout," a song by Schubert ar- 
ranged for the piano. 

Joseph Cutler, president of the 
Junior class, read from the Bible 
and introduced the speaker and 
pianist. 



ead the new books from 
our Lending Library 
* * * 

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